Green corridors provide lifeline for endangered koalas

In New South Wales, Australia, a conservation organization called Bangalow Koalas is working tirelessly to save the endangered koala. The organization has planted more than 336,000 trees on 119 properties, creating vital green corridors that connect fragmented habitats and provide safe passage for koalas and other endangered species.

“These green corridors are a lifeline for koalas and many other species such as the endangered black cockatoo, glider, possum and kangaroo,” said Linda Sparrow, president of the Bangalow Koala Society.” Koala habitats are increasingly fragmented and they provide safe passage for koalas, increase genetic diversity and protect the animals from human threats.

Koalas face a variety of threats, including wildfires, habitat loss due to logging and land development, and the devastating impact of the widespread bacterial disease Chlamydia. In fact, the Australian government’s five-year environmental report for 2022 shows that Australia has one of the worst rates of species decline among the world’s richest countries.

Green corridors provide lifeline for endangered koalas

Despite these challenges, Sparrow and her team are determined to save the koala. Their goal is to plant 500,000 trees by 2025, creating a network of green corridors covering hundreds of hectares.

“We call it the ‘domino effect,'” Sparrow explains.” Often, when charities plant trees in one location, other neighboring lands will want to participate in the conservation effort, thus expanding the scale of the koala restoration landscape.

The organization’s efforts have already had a positive impact. Volunteers like Lindy Stacker, who has been planting trees for more than five years, say the activity not only benefits the environment, but also brings communities together.

“It’s better than meditation or yoga,” Stacker said.” It’s a great way to connect with nature and make a real impact.

The economic benefits of saving koalas are also significant. A recent report by the Australian Koala Foundation estimates that koalas generate $3.2 billion a year for the tourism industry.

In New South Wales, Australia, a conservation organization called Bangalow Koalas is working tirelessly to save the endangered koala. The organization has planted more than 336,000 trees on 119 properties, creating vital green corridors that connect fragmented habitats and provide safe passage for koalas and other endangered species. “These green corridors are a lifeline for…

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